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Archive for the ‘life in poetry’ Category

P1010400

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in Swedish, “motiv från helgen”

On weekends, we escape the confines of our apartment by taking short drives and walks. This is actually our version of a romantic getaway.

These are some photographs we took over the weekend. I find them strangely “poetic”.

a bend in the road

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a meadow, hidden

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…and found!

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lovers

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…in the lake of shining waters*

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*  The term “Lake of Shining Waters” is taken from my beloved Anne of Green Gables Series by Lucy Maud Montgomery.

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a paradox

in Swedish, “en paradox”

snow-white winter:

gloomy and (darn) cold
yet…
thrilling, exciting and heart-warming

2008-12-06_road_84_towards_hudik

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in Swedish, “ljusa och vackra”

For my sister, Cherie, on her birthday

To many of us who are privileged to know her, she is “all things bright and beautiful”.

I could write a whole lot (!!!) of wonderful things about her, but she is terribly shy and self-effacing: “Manang, I don’t want you to write about me in your blog, okay?!”

But compelled I am to share some bits of memory, that you, too, may be inspired by her caring and generous spirit, of which she is known best for.

I once had a migraine incident during a brown-out in our area. Experiencing terrible pain with no air-conditioning in the heat of the day was plain hor-ri-ble. All I could do was just lie down in Papa’s room, which was the coolest in the house, wishing and praying for the medicine to work soon.

My sister, knowing I was sick, came to visit. After checking on me, she took a heavy mattress and dragged it downstairs, laid it on the floor next to the wide-open front door, where one can get the most from what little breeze that came in. Then she let me lay there and she cradled and massaged my head until I finally fell asleep.

¤   ¤   ¤

A few years ago, her husband gave her an elegant watch for a special occasion. Immediately after, she began saving up (and most likely did a lot of overtime) to buy a similar one. When she was finally able to afford it, she presented it to me and said,

Manang, I don’t want to have something so pretty that you don’t have.

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Happy Birthday, Babe.

You make Papa and I so proud.

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All things bright and beautiful,

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All creatures great and small,

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All things wise and wonderful,
The Lord God made them all.
Each little flower that opens,

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Each little bird that sings,

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He made their glowing colours,
He made their tiny wings.
The purple-headed mountain,

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The river running by,

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The sunset and the morning,

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That brightens up the sky;
The cold wind in the winter,

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The pleasant summer sun,
The ripe fruits in the garden,
He made them every one;
The tall trees in the greenwood,

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The meadows for our play,
The rushes by the water,

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To gather every day;
He gave us eyes to see them,
And lips that we might tell
How great is God Almighty,

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Who doeth all things well.

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All Things Bright and Beautiful, a hymn by Cecil F. Alexander, 1848

I had a goal to find a good excuse to use all of Windows Vista’s “sample photos” in one post.

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in Swedish, “här kommer regnet”

yesterday at around 7:30 in the evening

¤  ¤  ¤

The Rainy Day
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
The vine still clings to the moldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,
And the day is dark and dreary.

My life is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
My thoughts still cling to the moldering Past,
But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast
And the days are dark and dreary.

Be still, sad heart! and cease repining;
Behind the clouds is the sun still shining;
Thy fate is the common fate of all,
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.

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in Swedish, “shakespeares tolkning om nåd”

For my first try in embedding a YouTube video, I have chosen to feature the beautiful words of Shakespeare. (Somehow it felt a bit odd to use both “YouTube” and “Shakespeare” in one sentence.)

But before we doth proceedeth to the clippeth, alloweth me to giveth thee a proper introduction.

This excerpt is from one of his famous plays, “The Merchant of Venice”. The scene is in the court of the Duke of Venice where Shylock the Jew demands a pound of flesh (literally!) from Antonio, who is indebted to him but is unable to pay. Antonio’s dear friend, Bassanio, then offers to pay Shylock even twice the loan.

But Shylock, having been insulted by Antonio in the past because of his Jewish heritage, is unforgiving and would not relent. He demands that pound of flesh, as was agreed earlier by both parties.

Then appears Portia, Bassanio’s new wife, disguised as a young male “doctor of the law”. She tries to convince Shylock to take Bassanio’s offer and release Antonio from his debt.

In the movie, Shylock is played by Al Pacino, Antonio by Jeremy Irons, Bassanio by Joseph Fiennes, and Portia by Lynn Collins.

This is Portia’s meaningful monologue:

The quality of mercy is not strain’d,
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath: it is twice blest;
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes:
‘Tis mightiest in the mighty: it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown;
His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty,
Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;
But mercy is above this sceptred sway;
It is enthroned in the heart of kings,
It is an attribute to God himself;
And earthly power doth then show likest God’s
When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew,
Though justice be thy plea, consider this,
That, in the course of justice, none of us
Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy;
And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
The deeds of mercy.

Listen carefully as her speech begins at 0:44.

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in Swedish, “det är bevis nog”

For since the creation of the world

God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—

have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made,

so that men are without excuse.

Romans 1:20, New International Version

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Photos courtesy of J&L, Jossu, and Dwight.

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